The last taboo

There are lots of sucky, nasty, addictive and other generally unpleasant things about social media, but there are also times when its a winner.

I love when it delivers an article into my Facebook newsfeed that contains an “aha” moment.

I had one yesterday while reading an article in The Guardian called ‘I miss what I used to be like’: women’s stories of the menopause.

Naturally, I wanted to know what the women missed. Instead, I was struck by the comments about the symptoms they were batting … they weren’t the ones you normally hear about, like hot flushes and anger.

One said: “I was crying – I couldn’t stop crying.”

Yep.

Another admitted: “I noticed how heightened my anxiety was”.

Yep again.

I was particularly fascinated by the two women who reported having the adrenaline rushes that I’ve been experiencing for the past few years.

The rushes feel awful and incredibly off-putting, like you are drowning, without a drop of water in sight.

One women said she was waking nine times some nights “with a rush of adrenalised dread or panic with no cause as such, making going back to sleep difficult”.

Another said: “I would get a massive surge of adrenaline. I thought I was losing my mind or suffering from some undiagnosed condition.”

And I thought, thank heavens I’m not the only one. I felt much more normally abnormal after reading that.

The Guardian reported dozens of women getting touch about their menopause experiences, but “the vast majority requesting anonymity about their cases in a sign that it is still considered a social taboo”.

What the actual?

Mrs Woog did a podcast recently on menopause, where she also described it as “the last remaining female taboo”.

How is it still taboo in 2019 to talk about something that happens to half the human population in mid-life? That’s absurd.

As I’ve noted in earlier blog posts, I’ve been castigated by women for mentioning such mortifying things as hysterectomies and their side-effects publicly.

We are our own worst enemies. Why do we want everyone to keep their mouths’ shut about something so overwhelming and literally life changing?

Beats me.

So I’m going to continue ignoring them and keep talking about it, both on my blog and socially.

Over the weekend, I found myself chatting with a woman I’d just met about her experiences with all of the above. It was forward of me to launch straight into the big stuff, but I lack verbal boundaries. The conversation was frank, enjoyable and therapeutic.

It’s a relief to know you are not alone, don’t you think?

Song of the day: The Angels “No secrets”

 

 

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