Come live with me and be my love

john-donne

The eldest has announced that she loves writing poetry. Her teacher asked the class to write a poem based on their favourite colour. She chose black – my adorable little emo in the making – which isn’t technically a colour, but anyways, and she proceeded to recite a few lines that included cheery stuff about an abyss as we drove home from school yesterday.

I’d be tempted to worry, but she seemed so buoyant about it all.

Me, on the other hand, I’m not one for poetry … unless it’s John Donne.

Johnno wasn’t your average post-Middle Ages poet. His early stuff was quite racy (The New Yorker even calls it “erotica”) for his time – he was born in 1582 – but after his wife’s death he became an Anglican preacher and devoted his poetry writing to God. Talk about a turn around.

I hadn’t given much thought to Reverend Donne for a long time, but found myself reciting lines almost unconsciously yesterday after having a blub over this video …

So I dug out a book of his poetry.

Here are some of my favourite lovey dovey bits …

The Bait
Come live with me, and be my love,

And we will some new pleasures prove

Of golden sands, and crystal brooks,

With silken lines, and silver hooks.

How beautiful is that?

The Anniversary

All kings, and all their favourites,

All glory of honours, beauties, wits,

The sun itself, which makes times, as they pass,

Is elder by a year, now, than it was

When thou and I first one another saw:

All other things, to their destruction draw,

Only our love hath, nor decay;

This, no tomorrow hath, nor yesterday,

Running it never runs from us away,

But truly keeps his first, last, everlasting day.

And my favourite:

The Sun Rising

Busy old fool, unruly Sun,

Why dost thou thus,

Through windows, and through curtains, call on us?

Must to thy motions lovers’ seasons run?

Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide

Late school-boys and sour prentices,

Go tell court-huntsmen that the king will ride,

Call country ants to harvest offices;

Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime,

Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

Thy beams so reverend, and strong

Why shouldst thou think?

I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink,

But that I would not lose her sight so long.

If her eyes have not blinded thine,

Look, and to-morrow late tell me,

Whether both th’ Indias of spice and mine

Be where thou left’st them, or lie here with me.

Ask for those kings whom thou saw’st yesterday,

And thou shalt hear, “All here in one bed lay.”

She’s all states, and all princes I;

Nothing else is;

Princes do but play us; compared to this,

All honour’s mimic, all wealth alchemy.

Thou, Sun, art half as happy as we,

In that the world’s contracted thus;

Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be

To warm the world, that’s done in warming us.

Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere;

This bed thy center is, these walls thy sphere.

As for the erotica …

To His Mistress Going to Bed

Come, Madam, come, all rest my powers defy,

Until I labour, I in labour lie.

The foe oft-times having the foe in sight,

Is tir’d with standing though he never fight.

Off with that girdle, like heaven’s Zone glistering,

But a far fairer world encompassing.

Unpin that spangled breastplate which you wear,

That th’eyes of busy fools may be stopped there.

Unlace yourself, for that harmonious chime,

Tells me from you, that now it is bed time.

Off with that happy busk, which I envy,

That still can be, and still can stand so nigh.

Your gown going off, such beauteous state reveals,

As when from flowery meads th’hill’s shadow steals.

Off with that wiry Coronet and shew

The hairy Diadem which on you doth grow:

Now off with those shoes, and then safely tread

In this love’s hallow’d temple, this soft bed.

In such white robes, heaven’s Angels used to be

Received by men; Thou Angel bringst with thee

A heaven like Mahomet’s Paradise; and though

Ill spirits walk in white, we easily know,

By this these Angels from an evil sprite,

Those set our hairs, but these our flesh upright.

Licence my roving hands, and let them go,

Before, behind, between, above, below.

O my America! my new-found-land,

My kingdom, safeliest when with one man mann’d,

My Mine of precious stones, My Empirie,

How blest am I in this discovering thee!

To enter in these bonds, is to be free;

Then where my hand is set, my seal shall be.

Full nakedness! All joys are due to thee,

As souls unbodied, bodies uncloth’d must be,

To taste whole joys. Gems which you women use

Are like Atlanta’s balls, cast in men’s views,

That when a fool’s eye lighteth on a Gem,

His earthly soul may covet theirs, not them.

Like pictures, or like books’ gay coverings made

For lay-men, are all women thus array’d;

Themselves are mystic books, which only we

(Whom their imputed grace will dignify)

Must see reveal’d. Then since that I may know;

As liberally, as to a Midwife, shew

Thy self: cast all, yea, this white linen hence,

There is no penance due to innocence.

To teach thee, I am naked first; why then

What needst thou have more covering than a man.

Are you a poetry person?

Song of the day: Van Morrison “Rave on, John Donne” (it gets quite lovely after the rapping bit at the start)

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3 thoughts on “Come live with me and be my love

  1. I’m a poetry person. The Romantic poets are my favourite, particularly Keats. My absolute favourite poet is Judith Wright though. She wrote the most beautiful poetry about birds. The Rainbow Bird is very poignant. It’s funny but I was going to include a poem on my next blog post. You must have read my mind Alana.

  2. Great to see Donne again. Haven’t looked at him for a long time. And black in the human world is a colour and comes in many forms (you can make a very beautiful black out of transparent layers of red and green). Your daughter and mine should get together and discuss it.

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